Sports Drinks: Here’s the Catch

Reports indicate that 30 to 50 percent of U.S. teens consume energy drinks, and that 62 percent consume at least one sports drink a day. While the drinks hydrate and offer energy and minerals, there’s a side of them that most don’t talk about.

Sports drinks are full of acid and sugar used to enhance the flavor. In addition to adding flavor, however, these ingredients are also responsible for eroding the enamel of the athletes that drink them.

To make matters worse, breathing through the mouth while exercising leads to a dry mouth that, in addition to the acid in the drink, can lead to enamel erosion and cavities. In addition, researchers have found that signs of enamel erosion appeared only 5 days after treating the tested teeth to a condition where the teeth are immersed in sports drinks and then saliva.

Given all this, it’s best to stick to water for hydration, or, if sports drinks are consumed, to chew sugar free gum afterwards and avoid brushing teeth for at least an hour after drinking the sports drinks.

Source