Too Much Bottled Water Might Harm Kids’ Teeth

With more and more Americans using less and less tap water, a lack of fluoride could be a real concern. How many water bottles do you and your family buy in a year? How much is too much?

Ensuring that children get fluoride from a young age is very important. Most brands of bottled water aspire to have a ‘clean’ feel, but some lack fluoride which is a key ingredient in tap water that keeps children from developing tooth decay.

Fluoride’s main goal is to help diminish the dental decay that leads to cavities and oral diseases. Fluoride is said to “strengthen tooth structure while also inhibiting the bacteria’s capacity to produce acid from sugars.” Although there is no current research that confirms that bottled water is a direct cause of tooth decay, fluoride filled water is said to statistically “reduce tooth decay by 25%.” If you and your family mainly drink water out of a bottle, consider starting your child on a fluoride rinse to help prevent the development of cavities. Note that fluoride rinses are suggested for children ages 6 and older.

We all consume H2O multiple times a day in order to maintain a healthy balanced diet and rid our bodies of bad toxins. Studies have found that if you add fluoride along regular water consumption you will reduce your risk for oral health problems.

If you have any individual questions regarding which water is better, how to get more fluoride into your daily routine, or questions about how much fluoride is safe, ask your local dentist and/or set up a time to talk with them to discuss this. He/she may also prescribe fluoride-filled toothpaste that allows you to get your source while brushing if drinking fluoridated tap water isn’t an option.

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