Category Archives: Uncategorized

Beaver Enamel: What Can We Learn?

When you think about dental hygiene for your kids, are brushing and flossing the only things that come to mind? These two items are highly important to maintain good oral health, but recently, the American Dental Association “recommends earlier fluoride distribution for children,” meaning parents will have to put a tad more effort in caring for their children’s teeth.

Although other findings have stated that children should receive fluoride treatment by age six at the dentist, these new findings urge them to receive it even earlier than their first visit. Upon developing their first tooth as babies, the ADA believes that they should be receiving this treatment. One of the major issues in children’s teeth is the possibility of uncared teeth leading to decay and eventually cavities, but using this fluoride at an earlier time in life will help to decrease the chances for these issues to develop.

These findings came about through the Journal of the American Dental Association, and they suggest that “pea-sized quantities of toothpaste can lead to a higher risk of fluorosis when toothpaste is ingested and children younger than 3 should use smaller amounts of toothpaste.” Under the supervision of parents, children should make sure they brush for a solid 1 ½ to 2 minutes and be careful to spit out excess toothpaste to prevent from swallowing it. Parents should set up a dentist for their children and allow them to teach them the proper ways to care for their teeth. In doing so, their oral hygiene will be pristine for years to come!

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ADA Recommends Earlier Fluoride Distribution for Children

When you think about dental hygiene for your kids, are brushing and flossing the only things that come to mind? These two items are highly important to maintain good oral health, but recently, the American Dental Association “recommends earlier fluoride distribution for children,” meaning parents will have to put a tad more effort in caring for their children’s teeth.

Although other findings have stated that children should receive fluoride treatment by age six at the dentist, these new findings urge them to receive it even earlier than their first visit. Upon developing their first tooth as babies, the ADA believes that they should be receiving this treatment. One of the major issues in children’s teeth is the possibility of uncared teeth leading to decay and eventually cavities, but using this fluoride at an earlier time in life will help to decrease the chances for these issues to develop.

These findings came about through the Journal of the American Dental Association, and they suggest that “pea-sized quantities of toothpaste can lead to a higher risk of fluorosis when toothpaste is ingested and children younger than 3 should use smaller amounts of toothpaste.” Under the supervision of parents, children should make sure they brush for a solid 1 ½ to 2 minutes and be careful to spit out excess toothpaste to prevent from swallowing it. Parents should set up a dentist for their children and allow them to teach them the proper ways to care for their teeth. In doing so, their oral hygiene will be pristine for years to come!

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Why Add Mouthwash to Your Oral Health Routine?

Maybe you’ve seen the multi-colored bottles of minty-fresh mouthwash in the supermarket and have been wondering what the benefits are of adding mouthwash to your routine. Mouthwash won’t be the answer to all of your oral health needs, so read on to figure out what mouthwash can and can’t do for you.

When adding mouthwash to your routine, be aware that it is not meant to replace brushing and flossing! Mouthwash is an addition to your oral health repertoire, not a sole component.

Mouthwash is primarily used to keep breath fresh. If you suffer from halitosis, also known as chronic bad breath, then you should consult your dentist about treatment. While mouthwash is mainly for freshening breath, some rinses, such as fluoride rinses, can help protect teeth. Some dentists may even recommend certain mouthwashes to help meet oral health needs.

Your dentist can give you additional guidance about what mouthwash might be right for you. Mouthwashes can vary in what they are good for, such as preventing cavities or helping control plaque. We suggest asking your dentist for a sample to figure out what will work best for you!

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Is Alcohol Contributing to Periodontal Disease?

While it is known that alcohol consumption can seriously affect your liver and other organs, how can it affect your mouth?

A study in the Journal of Periodontology done by Brazilian researchers has found that alcohol can contribute to periodontal disease, commonly known as gum disease. According to the study, drinking can heighten risk factors for periodontitis and make your symptoms far worse for those who already have it.

The findings suggest that drinkers without periodontitis had an increase in gums that bled easily after manipulation and that they had higher amounts of plaque than those who refrained from drinking. A build up of plaque in your mouth can cause serious harm to your teeth, including decay, tooth discoloration, and receding gums.

An increase in plaque occurs because alcohol slows the production of saliva. Saliva helps fight decay by neutralizing the acids produced by plaque. A lack of saliva gives acids the opportunity to build up and cause gum disease and decay.

Next time you reach for that glass of wine, think twice about what it is doing to your gums. If you have periodontitis, drinking could be worsening the symptoms and further the disease. If you have healthy gums, it’s okay to have the occasional drink as long as you are also taking care of your oral health by brushing, flossing, and attending regular dental visits. Otherwise, those occasional cocktail hours could do some serious damage to your gums.

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Three Foods that Keep Your Teeth Healthy

We all know that brushing daily is a must if we want clean teeth and a healthy mouth. But, have you ever wondered what are some of the natural ways you can maintain your oral health? To satisfy your curiosity, here is a list of natural foods that help keep your teeth strong and healthy.

Dairy

Dairy products are generally full of protein and calcium—which can help strengthen teeth—while also naturally low in sugar. Cheese has been proven to raise the pH in a person’s mouth, which greatly reduces the risk of tooth decay. Yogurt is chock full of probiotics, which are great for your gums and help prevent cavities. Just make sure to choose a yogurt low in sugar!

Nuts

Many nuts—like Almonds—are great for your teeth. Most are naturally low in carbohydrates, which is great for cavity prevention, while also being a great source of calcium and protein!

Leafy Greens & Vegetables

Many vegetables are full of vitamins and minerals that are beneficial to your oral health. Leafy greens like Kale and Spinach are high in calcium which help strengthen tooth enamel. Celery and cucumbers both contain high amounts of water, which helps to rinse your mouth while supplying some nutrients!

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Do You Know What Causes Bad Breath?

Halitosis (commonly known as simply “bad breath”) affects around one in four people in the United States. In most of these cases, the bad breath comes from one of five reasons: bacterial growth, diet choice, dry mouth, smoking, and disease.

Many are finding that brushing their tongue helps reduce bad breath by disrupting and scrubbing away bacteria living on your tongue. Some of the bacteria that live in the mouth are responsible for producing bad odors.

Others find that certain foods are the biggest culprits. Garlic and onion are the most notorious ones, but eating diets low in vegetables can also be a source of bad breath. Another very common source of bad breath is having a dry mouth. Without saliva washing away bacteria, dead cells, and food particles on a regular basis the resulting smell tends to linger.

There are other factors that can cause halitosis. People with diabetes, kidney failure, lung infections, or liver failure can also suffer from halitosis as a result of their disease. Smoking, as something that inherently does not smell good and dries out the mouth, can also be a culprit.

If you find that you have chronic halitosis, it may be worth considering going to see a dentist about it, as they can provide the proper steps needed towards getting rid of it.

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What’s Bone Loss Got To Do With It?

Women are at a higher risk for bone fractures when they enter the menopausal stage, but that’s not all…

According to a new study at Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine, they “also may be at a higher risk for gum disease.” It is stated that further investigations may need to occur to finalize some of the correlations, but the researchers did see a direct link between postmenopausal women and gum disease issues.

During menopause, estrogen levels drop and lower estrogen levels are said to “impact the mouth and cause inflammatory changes in the body that can lead to gingivitis, a precursor to gum disease.” If left untreated, the end result is unfortunately tooth loss.

Wanting to further research the correlation between gum disease and post-menopausal women, the researchers studied 191 women between the ages of 51 and 80 who had gone through menopause in the last ten years. The women were not smokers or on hormonal replacement therapy or any other medications for the past five years. What they found was that the strongest sign of gum disease was in fact bone loss scores. The scores of this analysis were also balanced with the factors of “weight, height, previous bone fractures, rheumatoid arthritis, smoking habits, diabetes, and other factors.”

So what does this mean for women going through menopause? Make sure to have regular dental checkups! Although these should already be a part of your oral health routine, they can help postmenopausal women be aware of changes in their oral health due to the effects of menopause.

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How to Keep Your Teeth Healthy This Holiday Season

The holiday season can be a difficult time for your teeth. You are surrounded by sweets and drinks on what seems like a constant basis and it can wreak havoc on your teeth. These treats leave a lot of sugar on your teeth that turn into enamel-wearing acid when exposed to bacteria. Here are a couple easy ways to avoid cavities during this sweet holiday season!

Consume Candy in Moderation

We know it is hard to stop snacking once you start, but try to limit your candy consumption. Perhaps opt for sugar-free candy as an alternative to help protect your teeth. Also, it is better for your teeth to eat chocolate then chewy, sticky candies that can get trapped in between teeth.

Red or White Wine?

Wine is very acidic, which can harm your teeth. During the holidays, reach for red instead of white! Although red wine is known for causing stains (tip: sip some water between glasses to avoid staining!), it is less acidic than white wine. White wine is more harmful to your teeth in the long run, so try drinking red instead and pair it with foods high in calcium and phosphorus such as cheese, poultry, and nuts.

In the midsts of these holiday treats, make sure to keep up your brushing and flossing routine. To take it a step further, try rinsing your mouth after eating or drinking sugary foods!

No Surgery, No Sutures, Only Smiles

Traditional gum grafting to correct issues of gum recession can be a painful procedure for many. As time goes on and periodontal issues increase, the potential for discomfort during a procedure only grows.

The Pinhole Surgical Technique (PST) is a minimally invasive treatment that can reverse gum recession without the need of grafts. One of the main benefits of this procedure is that a patient can have as many teeth treated in a single sitting as desired.

There are limitations with traditional gum grafting techniques, and it can sometimes take more than a year to complete an entire mouth. However, PST has significantly less pain and recovery time than regular gum grafting.

If you are worried about gingival recession or are otherwise suffering from periodontal issues, contact us today.

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Whitening Wisdom: What You Should Know

When it comes to teeth whitening, consumers have a wide variety of choices. The sheer volume of over-the-counter options alone can cause great deal of confusion. Are they safe? Do they work? Which products work best? To help answer these questions, we’ve broken down some common options for a pearly white smile.

In office bleaching

The fastest, albeit priciest, route to bleaching is in-office teeth bleaching. These procedures are also the safest, as they are handled by a dental professional and not a consumer who is capable of misunderstanding the directions for a given over-the-counter method. This procedure will typically take between 1-2 hours and employs the use of bleaching gels with high amounts of hydrogen peroxide. The powerful nature of these gels will often result in teeth that are significantly whiter when compared to take home products.

Whitening tray from your dentist

One alternative to over-the-counter whitening remedies is a custom whitening tray made by your dentist. The tray is fitted specifically for your mouth, can be done in your home just like any over-the-counter whitening procedure, and is typically worn for an hour or two every day until the procedure is complete. This can last for up to a month.

Over the counter

If you decide to go with an over-the-counter whitening option, there are a few pieces of information you should know. Tooth whitening products don’t need FDA approval before landing on the shelves of your local pharmacy, as they are considered a ‘cosmetic’ item. You can rest assured, however, that the FDA has not found a whitening product to be harmful when used correctly.

Just one product-Crest 3D Whitestrips-has received the ADA seal of acceptance, a “symbol that an independent panel reviewed and approved the product for its safety and effectiveness.” However, many over-the-counter whitening products can still yield positive results when used correctly.

One will often experience some degree of tooth sensitivity when using these products, but this will go away once the bleaching process is finished. The whitening process with many of these products can take anywhere between 2-6 weeks.

If you have any questions about teeth whitening, contact your local dentist today!

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