Bacteria-Causing Gum Disease May Lead to Oral Cancer Growth

As the body ages it becomes increasingly important to pay close attention to your oral hygiene. Keeping up with your dental health wards off common issues such as cavities and plaque. More important than this however, maintaining good hygiene limits your risk for gum disease and oral cancer.

A study from Case Western Reserve University states that the “fatty acids from bacteria present in gum disease may cause Kaposi’s Sarcoma (KS)-related lesions and tumors in the mouth.” The study suggests the “byproducts of fatty acids” caused these oral tumors. As are the results with many forms of cancer, the research proposes pre-screenings of people with periodontal disease to catch tumors before the situation worsens. People with periodontal disease are known to have high levels of bacteria present in their mouth’s saliva, which can exacerbate the situation.

When the research group was examined, people wanted to find out why some were developing these cancerous tumors, but also why those were not and what separates them from each other. This specific research concluded “the fatty acids impacted the replication of KS.” With fatty acids present, the body could not prevent the growth of the cancer.

To ensure that you are not at high-risk for oral cancer as you age, make sure to not let your regular oral hygiene fall by the wayside. It’s also important to regularly schedule appointments at your local dentist’s office. If you already have periodontal disease, make sure you follow the treatment plans outlined by your dentist.

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